The Garbage Collection Handbook
The art of automatic memory management
Richard Jones, Antony Hosking, Eliot Moss
Chapman and Hall/CRC, 978-1420082791

The authors

Richard Jones Richard Jones [mail, web]
is Professor of Computer Systems at the School of Computing, University of Kent, Canterbury. He received a BA in Mathematics from Oxford University in 1976. He spent a few years teaching before returning to higher education at the University of Kent, where he has remained ever since, receiving an MSc in Computer Science in 1989. In 1998, he co-founded the International Symposium on Memory Management, of which he was the inaugural Programme Chair. He has published numerous papers on garbage collection, heap visualisation and electronic publishing, and he regularly sits on the programme committees of leading international conferences. He is a member of the Editorial Board of Software Practice and Experience. He was made an Honorary Fellow of the University of Glasgow in 2005 in recognition of his research and scholarship in dynamic memory management, He was named a Distinguished Scientist of the Association for Computing Machinery in 2006, and in 2014 a Fellow of the British Computer Society, a Fellow of the RSA and a member of AITO. He is married, with three children, and in his spare time he races Dart 18 catamarans.

Antony Hosking Antony Hosking [mail, web]
is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Purdue University, West Lafayette. He received a BSc in Mathematical Sciences from the University of Adelaide, Australia, in 1985, and an MSc in Computer Science from the University of Waikato, New Zealand, in 1987. He continued his graduate studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, receiving a PhD in Computer Science in 1995. His work is in the area of programming language design and implementation, with specific interests in database and persistent programming languages, object-oriented database systems, dynamic memory management, compiler optimisations, and architectural support for programming languages and applications. He was named a Distinguished Scientist of the Association for Computing Machinery in 2012 and is a Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He regularly serves on programme and steering committees of major conferences, mostly focused on programming language design and implementation. He is married, with five children. When the opportunity arises, he most enjoys sitting somewhere behind the bowler's arm on the first day of any Test match at the Adelaide Oval.

Eliot Moss Eliot Moss [mail, web]
is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the
University of Massachusetts Amherst. He received a BSEE in 1975, MSEE in 1978, and PhD in Computer Science in 1981, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. After four years of military service, he joined the Computer Science faculty at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He works in the area of programming languages and their implementation, and has built garbage collectors since 1978. In addition to his research on automatic memory management, he is known for his work on persistent programming languages, virtual machine implementation, transactional programming and transactional memory. He worked with IBM researchers to license the Jikes RVM Java virtual machine for academic research, which eventually led to its release as an open source project. In 2007 he was named a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and in 2009 a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. In 2012 he was co-recipient of the Edsger W. Dijkstra Prize in Distributed Computing for work on transactional memory. He served for four years as Secretary of the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Programming Languages, and served on many programme and steering committees of the significant venues related to his areas of research. Ordained a priest of the Episcopal Church in 2005, he leads a congregation in addition to his full-time academic position. He is married, with two children. He enjoys listening to recorded books and movie-going, and has been known to play the harp.